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Doctors

Working as part of a team of medical, and non-medical staff, Doctors within primary and secondary care (as well as other settings) help to deliver patient care to the highest standards. There are a wide range of career options available, as well as ample opportunity for further training and development.

With over 60 specialisms, training as a Doctor can open doors for involvement in management, teaching, research and more… knowing with each option that you will be working to make a real difference within people’s lives, helping to alleviate pain, discomfort and other symptoms in patients in your community.

Working within the medical sector can be very rewarding, as you face intellectual and practical challenges to deliver the best possible care for patients, in a career path where each day is varied and interesting.

You can explore a huge range of areas within medicine, including General Practice, Emergency Medicine, Anaesthetics, Surgery, and so many more.

Click below to explore some of the roles (and their entry requirements) that may be of interest within a career in medicine.

Alternatively find out how to make an application at a UK university –

http://www.studyinghealthcare.ac.uk

Anaesthesia

Anaesthetists are based within hospitals and are responsible for administering, as well as selecting the most appropriate, anaesthetics to patients for their surgical and medical (or psychiatric) procedures. This may apply to a number of types of surgery, critical care, childbirth, radiology, dentistry, resuscitation, chronic pain management and more – depending on the specific patient needs, this could be a general, local or regional application. Generally, following the necessary preparation and assessments, anaesthetic is administered using a needle in the patient’s vein; the patient is then monitored by the Anaesthetist throughout their procedure, as well as during reversal and recovery stages.

Typical entry requirements:

  • Completion of a medical degree (requiring relevant A-Level and GSCE qualifications), followed by:
  • Two-year foundation programme, and:
  • Two to three years of core training
  • Experience in the speciality, or in a related field (such as intensive care medicine) would be advantageous to pursuing a career in this area

Emergency Medicine

Doctors within this specialism typically deal with patients with life-threatening, or serious, injuries and illnesses, carrying out assessments and treatments on an immediate level. Conditions you might encounter could include severe bleeds, trauma to the brain or other major organs, loss of consciousness, broken bones, cardiac arrest, breathing difficulties and more.

 Typical entry requirements:

  • Completion of a medical degree (requiring relevant A-Level and GSCE qualifications), followed by:
  • Two-year foundation programme, and:
  • Additional emergency medical training – either RTT (run through training, ST1-ST6) or core training (3 years)
  • Experience in the speciality, or in a related field (such as intensive care or acute internal medicine) would be advantageous to pursuing a career in this area

General Practice (GP)

A General Practitioner (GP) will treat most common medical conditions, focusing on patient care in a more holistic sense (social and psychological as well as physical care) and referring patients forward to other medical services, such as hospitals, for specialist or urgent treatment.

GPs work as part of a wide healthcare team and are often one of the first points of contact for patients of any age presenting with a wide range of physical or mental health problems. As well as within primary care, GPs occasionally work within hospital teams or run clinics in other settings, such as schools or nursing homes. There is a wide variation of career options and specialisms available to these kinds of doctors.

Typical tasks usually include clinical examinations to assess, diagnose or monitor a patient’s condition (which may involve the use of specialist equipment), carrying out tests and interpreting results, and using basic life support or emergency procedures, as necessary.

Typical entry requirements:

  • Completion of a medical degree (requiring relevant A-Level and GSCE qualifications), and:
  • Two-year foundation programme, is required before:
  • GP Specialist training (typically a minimum of 3 years)
  • Doctors in training, or those who have already qualified in other specialities may apply for GP Specialist training

Paediatrics

Doctors working within Paediatrics focus on managing medical conditions impacting babies and children. The specialism can be divided into four main areas: general paediatrics (hospital-based, covering children from birth all the way up to the age of 16), neonatology (usually within an intensive care unit for new-born babies, including those that are premature), community paediatrics (working with young people with behavioural, developmental or social problems, or physical disabilities) and paediatric cardiology (treating children with heart conditions).

Typical entry requirements:

  • Completion of a medical degree (requiring relevant A-Level and GSCE qualifications), and:
  • Two-year foundation programme (you will need to apply to paediatrics during your F2 year)
  • Completion of 4-7 years of specialist training
  • Additional training will be required to specialise in paediatric cardiology